jueves, 25 de julio de 2013

The Penn Museum expands digital access to its collections and research projects


                Maya Chama Cup, Guatemala, from The Maya Vase Conservation Project (Lynn A. Grant, 2006).

PHILADELPHIA, PA.- As a repository of wide-ranging, international collections, original field notes and archival data from roughly 300 archaeological and anthropological expeditions around the world, the Penn Museum in Philadelphia is committed to open, global, digital access for scholars and the public. In 2012, celebrating the Museum's 125th anniversary, the Penn Museum launched two online projects to expand access to its collections and share information about its research history: the online Collections Database and interactive Research Map and Timeline. While those projects continue to grow, the Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity to further expand research data access to scholars.
Increased Data, Accessibility on www.penn.museum
Launched in January 2012, the online Collections Database has gradually expanded over the past 18 months with a wealth of additional content. It now contains more than 332,851 object records representing 692,850 objects, and more than 90,000 images illustrating 34,067 object records. In addition to the growth in available data, the functionality of the online interface has also been improved, allowing more refined searching and browsing of the Museum’s collections, and—new this month—the ability for online visitors to download the Museum’s collections metadata to sort, study, and use it to suit their own research interests under a CC BY 3.0 Creative Commons license.

Launched in December 2012, the interactive Research Map and Timeline highlights many of the Museum's research projects since its founding in 1887. Initially, showcasing 125 projects (commemorating the Museum’s 125th anniversary on December 6, 2012), the interactive website has now grown to include 267 research projects.

New Partnership with Digital Antiquity Expands Scholarly Access
Finally, in another recent expansion of scholarly access, the Penn Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity—a collaborative non-profit organization devoted to enhancing preservation of and access to irreplaceable archaeological records and data—to provide free, open access to supplementary material from 19 books previously published by the Museum since 2000. This supplementary material—archaeological data sets, color images, and original field reports from scholarly expeditions—is now available online at tDAR—The Digital Archaeological Record—a unique digital repository for archaeological data. Previously provided on CDs or DVDs in the back of the Museum’s research publications, these supplementary materials are now available for download free of charge by registered tDAR users. Since tDAR’s content is indexed by major search engines, this collaboration exposes the Museum’s published digital content to searchers who may otherwise be unaware of these books and their associated digital media. The books themselves are available for purchase at the University of Pennsylvania Press (Penn Press) website. Supplementary materials are currently available for the following books:

Asia & the Pacific
•Ban Chiang, a Prehistoric Village Site in Northeast Thailand, Volume 1: The Human Skeletal Remain
•Mapping Mongolia: Situating Mongolia in the World from Geologic Time to the Present
•Santa Cruz Island Figure Sculpture and Its Social and Ritual Contexts

Middle East/Eurasia
•Botanical Aspects of Environment and Economy at Gordion, Turkey

•Exploring Iran: The Photography of Erich F. Schmidt, 1930-1940

•Gordion Seals and Sealings Individuals and Society

•Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers of the Baikal Region, Siberia Bioarchaeological Studies of Past Life Ways

•Peoples and Crafts in Period IVB at Hasanlu, Iran

Mesoamerica
•Tikal Report 11: Map of the Ruins of Tikal, El Petén, Guatemala and Georeferenced Versions of the Maps Therein

•The Artifacts of Tikal—Ornamental and Ceremonial Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal, Report 27A

•The Artifacts of Tikal—Utilitarian Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal Report 27B
•The Maya Vase Conservation Project

•Settlement Archaeology at Quiriguá, Guatemala

•Tikal Report 34, Part A: Additions and Alterations: A Commentary on the Architecture of the North Acropolis, Tikal, Guatemala

•Tikal Report 37: Historical Archaeology at Tikal, Guatemala

Europe
•Dún Ailinne: Excavations at an Irish Royal Site, 1968-1975

•Etruscan Myth, Sacred History, and Legend

•Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 2: The Settlement History of the Vrokastro Area and Related Studies

•Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 3 The Vrokastro Regional Survey Project, Sites and Pottery 




Source: artdaily.org
PHILADELPHIA, PA.- As a repository of wide-ranging, international collections, original field notes and archival data from roughly 300 archaeological and anthropological expeditions around the world, the Penn Museum in Philadelphia is committed to open, global, digital access for scholars and the public. In 2012, celebrating the Museum's 125th anniversary, the Penn Museum launched two online projects to expand access to its collections and share information about its research history: the online Collections Database and interactive Research Map and Timeline. While those projects continue to grow, the Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity to further expand research data access to scholars. Increased Data, Accessibility on www.penn.museum Launched in January 2012, the online Collections Database has gradually expanded over the past 18 months with a wealth of additional content. It now contains more than 332,851 object records representing 692,850 objects, and more than 90,000 images illustrating 34,067 object records. In addition to the growth in available data, the functionality of the online interface has also been improved, allowing more refined searching and browsing of the Museum’s collections, and—new this month—the ability for online visitors to download the Museum’s collections metadata to sort, study, and use it to suit their own research interests under a CC BY 3.0 Creative Commons license. Launched in December 2012, the interactive Research Map and Timeline highlights many of the Museum's research projects since its founding in 1887. Initially, showcasing 125 projects (commemorating the Museum’s 125th anniversary on December 6, 2012), the interactive website has now grown to include 267 research projects. New Partnership with Digital Antiquity Expands Scholarly Access Finally, in another recent expansion of scholarly access, the Penn Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity—a collaborative non-profit organization devoted to enhancing preservation of and access to irreplaceable archaeological records and data—to provide free, open access to supplementary material from 19 books previously published by the Museum since 2000. This supplementary material—archaeological data sets, color images, and original field reports from scholarly expeditions—is now available online at tDAR—The Digital Archaeological Record—a unique digital repository for archaeological data. Previously provided on CDs or DVDs in the back of the Museum’s research publications, these supplementary materials are now available for download free of charge by registered tDAR users. Since tDAR’s content is indexed by major search engines, this collaboration exposes the Museum’s published digital content to searchers who may otherwise be unaware of these books and their associated digital media. The books themselves are available for purchase at the University of Pennsylvania Press (Penn Press) website. Supplementary materials are currently available for the following books: Asia & the Pacific •Ban Chiang, a Prehistoric Village Site in Northeast Thailand, Volume 1: The Human Skeletal Remains •Mapping Mongolia: Situating Mongolia in the World from Geologic Time to the Present •Santa Cruz Island Figure Sculpture and Its Social and Ritual Contexts Middle East/Eurasia •Botanical Aspects of Environment and Economy at Gordion, Turkey •Exploring Iran: The Photography of Erich F. Schmidt, 1930-1940 •Gordion Seals and Sealings Individuals and Society •Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers of the Baikal Region, Siberia Bioarchaeological Studies of Past Life Ways •Peoples and Crafts in Period IVB at Hasanlu, Iran Mesoamerica •Tikal Report 11: Map of the Ruins of Tikal, El Petén, Guatemala and Georeferenced Versions of the Maps Therein •The Artifacts of Tikal—Ornamental and Ceremonial Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal, Report 27A •The Artifacts of Tikal—Utilitarian Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal Report 27B •The Maya Vase Conservation Project •Settlement Archaeology at Quiriguá, Guatemala •Tikal Report 34, Part A: Additions and Alterations: A Commentary on the Architecture of the North Acropolis, Tikal, Guatemala •Tikal Report 37: Historical Archaeology at Tikal, Guatemala Europe •Dún Ailinne: Excavations at an Irish Royal Site, 1968-1975 •Etruscan Myth, Sacred History, and Legend •Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 2: The Settlement History of the Vrokastro Area and Related Studies •Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 3 The Vrokastro Regional Survey Project, Sites and Pottery

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/63985/The-Penn-Museum-expands-digital-access-to-its-collections-and-research-projects#.UfNY221vaSo[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
PHILADELPHIA, PA.- As a repository of wide-ranging, international collections, original field notes and archival data from roughly 300 archaeological and anthropological expeditions around the world, the Penn Museum in Philadelphia is committed to open, global, digital access for scholars and the public. In 2012, celebrating the Museum's 125th anniversary, the Penn Museum launched two online projects to expand access to its collections and share information about its research history: the online Collections Database and interactive Research Map and Timeline. While those projects continue to grow, the Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity to further expand research data access to scholars. Increased Data, Accessibility on www.penn.museum Launched in January 2012, the online Collections Database has gradually expanded over the past 18 months with a wealth of additional content. It now contains more than 332,851 object records representing 692,850 objects, and more than 90,000 images illustrating 34,067 object records. In addition to the growth in available data, the functionality of the online interface has also been improved, allowing more refined searching and browsing of the Museum’s collections, and—new this month—the ability for online visitors to download the Museum’s collections metadata to sort, study, and use it to suit their own research interests under a CC BY 3.0 Creative Commons license. Launched in December 2012, the interactive Research Map and Timeline highlights many of the Museum's research projects since its founding in 1887. Initially, showcasing 125 projects (commemorating the Museum’s 125th anniversary on December 6, 2012), the interactive website has now grown to include 267 research projects. New Partnership with Digital Antiquity Expands Scholarly Access Finally, in another recent expansion of scholarly access, the Penn Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity—a collaborative non-profit organization devoted to enhancing preservation of and access to irreplaceable archaeological records and data—to provide free, open access to supplementary material from 19 books previously published by the Museum since 2000. This supplementary material—archaeological data sets, color images, and original field reports from scholarly expeditions—is now available online at tDAR—The Digital Archaeological Record—a unique digital repository for archaeological data. Previously provided on CDs or DVDs in the back of the Museum’s research publications, these supplementary materials are now available for download free of charge by registered tDAR users. Since tDAR’s content is indexed by major search engines, this collaboration exposes the Museum’s published digital content to searchers who may otherwise be unaware of these books and their associated digital media. The books themselves are available for purchase at the University of Pennsylvania Press (Penn Press) website. Supplementary materials are currently available for the following books: Asia & the Pacific •Ban Chiang, a Prehistoric Village Site in Northeast Thailand, Volume 1: The Human Skeletal Remains •Mapping Mongolia: Situating Mongolia in the World from Geologic Time to the Present •Santa Cruz Island Figure Sculpture and Its Social and Ritual Contexts Middle East/Eurasia •Botanical Aspects of Environment and Economy at Gordion, Turkey •Exploring Iran: The Photography of Erich F. Schmidt, 1930-1940 •Gordion Seals and Sealings Individuals and Society •Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers of the Baikal Region, Siberia Bioarchaeological Studies of Past Life Ways •Peoples and Crafts in Period IVB at Hasanlu, Iran Mesoamerica •Tikal Report 11: Map of the Ruins of Tikal, El Petén, Guatemala and Georeferenced Versions of the Maps Therein •The Artifacts of Tikal—Ornamental and Ceremonial Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal, Report 27A •The Artifacts of Tikal—Utilitarian Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal Report 27B •The Maya Vase Conservation Project •Settlement Archaeology at Quiriguá, Guatemala •Tikal Report 34, Part A: Additions and Alterations: A Commentary on the Architecture of the North Acropolis, Tikal, Guatemala •Tikal Report 37: Historical Archaeology at Tikal, Guatemala Europe •Dún Ailinne: Excavations at an Irish Royal Site, 1968-1975 •Etruscan Myth, Sacred History, and Legend •Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 2: The Settlement History of the Vrokastro Area and Related Studies •Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 3 The Vrokastro Regional Survey Project, Sites and Pottery

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/63985/The-Penn-Museum-expands-digital-access-to-its-collections-and-research-projects#.UfNY221vaSo[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
PHILADELPHIA, PA.- As a repository of wide-ranging, international collections, original field notes and archival data from roughly 300 archaeological and anthropological expeditions around the world, the Penn Museum in Philadelphia is committed to open, global, digital access for scholars and the public. In 2012, celebrating the Museum's 125th anniversary, the Penn Museum launched two online projects to expand access to its collections and share information about its research history: the online Collections Database and interactive Research Map and Timeline. While those projects continue to grow, the Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity to further expand research data access to scholars. Increased Data, Accessibility on www.penn.museum Launched in January 2012, the online Collections Database has gradually expanded over the past 18 months with a wealth of additional content. It now contains more than 332,851 object records representing 692,850 objects, and more than 90,000 images illustrating 34,067 object records. In addition to the growth in available data, the functionality of the online interface has also been improved, allowing more refined searching and browsing of the Museum’s collections, and—new this month—the ability for online visitors to download the Museum’s collections metadata to sort, study, and use it to suit their own research interests under a CC BY 3.0 Creative Commons license. Launched in December 2012, the interactive Research Map and Timeline highlights many of the Museum's research projects since its founding in 1887. Initially, showcasing 125 projects (commemorating the Museum’s 125th anniversary on December 6, 2012), the interactive website has now grown to include 267 research projects. New Partnership with Digital Antiquity Expands Scholarly Access Finally, in another recent expansion of scholarly access, the Penn Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity—a collaborative non-profit organization devoted to enhancing preservation of and access to irreplaceable archaeological records and data—to provide free, open access to supplementary material from 19 books previously published by the Museum since 2000. This supplementary material—archaeological data sets, color images, and original field reports from scholarly expeditions—is now available online at tDAR—The Digital Archaeological Record—a unique digital repository for archaeological data. Previously provided on CDs or DVDs in the back of the Museum’s research publications, these supplementary materials are now available for download free of charge by registered tDAR users. Since tDAR’s content is indexed by major search engines, this collaboration exposes the Museum’s published digital content to searchers who may otherwise be unaware of these books and their associated digital media. The books themselves are available for purchase at the University of Pennsylvania Press (Penn Press) website. Supplementary materials are currently available for the following books: Asia & the Pacific •Ban Chiang, a Prehistoric Village Site in Northeast Thailand, Volume 1: The Human Skeletal Remains •Mapping Mongolia: Situating Mongolia in the World from Geologic Time to the Present •Santa Cruz Island Figure Sculpture and Its Social and Ritual Contexts Middle East/Eurasia •Botanical Aspects of Environment and Economy at Gordion, Turkey •Exploring Iran: The Photography of Erich F. Schmidt, 1930-1940 •Gordion Seals and Sealings Individuals and Society •Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers of the Baikal Region, Siberia Bioarchaeological Studies of Past Life Ways •Peoples and Crafts in Period IVB at Hasanlu, Iran Mesoamerica •Tikal Report 11: Map of the Ruins of Tikal, El Petén, Guatemala and Georeferenced Versions of the Maps Therein •The Artifacts of Tikal—Ornamental and Ceremonial Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal, Report 27A •The Artifacts of Tikal—Utilitarian Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal Report 27B •The Maya Vase Conservation Project •Settlement Archaeology at Quiriguá, Guatemala •Tikal Report 34, Part A: Additions and Alterations: A Commentary on the Architecture of the North Acropolis, Tikal, Guatemala •Tikal Report 37: Historical Archaeology at Tikal, Guatemala Europe •Dún Ailinne: Excavations at an Irish Royal Site, 1968-1975 •Etruscan Myth, Sacred History, and Legend •Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 2: The Settlement History of the Vrokastro Area and Related Studies •Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 3 The Vrokastro Regional Survey Project, Sites and Pottery

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/63985/The-Penn-Museum-expands-digital-access-to-its-collections-and-research-projects#.UfNY221vaSo[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
Maya Chama Cup, Guatemala, from The Maya Vase Conservation Project (Lynn A. Grant, 2006). PHILADELPHIA, PA.- As a repository of wide-ranging, international collections, original field notes and archival data from roughly 300 archaeological and anthropological expeditions around the world, the Penn Museum in Philadelphia is committed to open, global, digital access for scholars and the public. In 2012, celebrating the Museum's 125th anniversary, the Penn Museum launched two online projects to expand access to its collections and share information about its research history: the online Collections Database and interactive Research Map and Timeline. While those projects continue to grow, the Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity to further expand research data access to scholars. Increased Data, Accessibility on www.penn.museum Launched in January 2012, the online Collections Database has gradually expanded over the past 18 months with a wealth of additional content. It now contains more than 332,851 object records representing 692,850 objects, and more than 90,000 images illustrating 34,067 object records. In addition to the growth in available data, the functionality of the online interface has also been improved, allowing more refined searching and browsing of the Museum’s collections, and—new this month—the ability for online visitors to download the Museum’s collections metadata to sort, study, and use it to suit their own research interests under a CC BY 3.0 Creative Commons license. Launched in December 2012, the interactive Research Map and Timeline highlights many of the Museum's research projects since its founding in 1887. Initially, showcasing 125 projects (commemorating the Museum’s 125th anniversary on December 6, 2012), the interactive website has now grown to include 267 research projects. New Partnership with Digital Antiquity Expands Scholarly Access Finally, in another recent expansion of scholarly access, the Penn Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity—a collaborative non-profit organization devoted to enhancing preservation of and access to irreplaceable archaeological records and data—to provide free, open access to supplementary material from 19 books previously published by the Museum since 2000. This supplementary material—archaeological data sets, color images, and original field reports from scholarly expeditions—is now available online at tDAR—The Digital Archaeological Record—a unique digital repository for archaeological data. Previously provided on CDs or DVDs in the back of the Museum’s research publications, these supplementary materials are now available for download free of charge by registered tDAR users. Since tDAR’s content is indexed by major search engines, this collaboration exposes the Museum’s published digital content to searchers who may otherwise be unaware of these books and their associated digital media. The books themselves are available for purchase at the University of Pennsylvania Press (Penn Press) website. Supplementary materials are currently available for the following books: Asia & the Pacific •Ban Chiang, a Prehistoric Village Site in Northeast Thailand, Volume 1: The Human Skeletal Remains •Mapping Mongolia: Situating Mongolia in the World from Geologic Time to the Present •Santa Cruz Island Figure Sculpture and Its Social and Ritual Contexts Middle East/Eurasia •Botanical Aspects of Environment and Economy at Gordion, Turkey •Exploring Iran: The Photography of Erich F. Schmidt, 1930-1940 •Gordion Seals and Sealings Individuals and Society •Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers of the Baikal Region, Siberia Bioarchaeological Studies of Past Life Ways •Peoples and Crafts in Period IVB at Hasanlu, Iran Mesoamerica •Tikal Report 11: Map of the Ruins of Tikal, El Petén, Guatemala and Georeferenced Versions of the Maps Therein •The Artifacts of Tikal—Ornamental and Ceremonial Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal, Report 27A •The Artifacts of Tikal—Utilitarian Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal Report 27B •The Maya Vase Conservation Project •Settlement Archaeology at Quiriguá, Guatemala •Tikal Report 34, Part A: Additions and Alterations: A Commentary on the Architecture of the North Acropolis, Tikal, Guatemala •Tikal Report 37: Historical Archaeology at Tikal, Guatemala Europe •Dún Ailinne: Excavations at an Irish Royal Site, 1968-1975 •Etruscan Myth, Sacred History, and Legend •Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 2: The Settlement History of the Vrokastro Area and Related Studies •Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 3 The Vrokastro Regional Survey Project, Sites and Pottery

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/63985/The-Penn-Museum-expands-digital-access-to-its-collections-and-research-projects#.UfNY221vaSo[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
Maya Chama Cup, Guatemala, from The Maya Vase Conservation Project (Lynn A. Grant, 2006). PHILADELPHIA, PA.- As a repository of wide-ranging, international collections, original field notes and archival data from roughly 300 archaeological and anthropological expeditions around the world, the Penn Museum in Philadelphia is committed to open, global, digital access for scholars and the public. In 2012, celebrating the Museum's 125th anniversary, the Penn Museum launched two online projects to expand access to its collections and share information about its research history: the online Collections Database and interactive Research Map and Timeline. While those projects continue to grow, the Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity to further expand research data access to scholars. Increased Data, Accessibility on www.penn.museum Launched in January 2012, the online Collections Database has gradually expanded over the past 18 months with a wealth of additional content. It now contains more than 332,851 object records representing 692,850 objects, and more than 90,000 images illustrating 34,067 object records. In addition to the growth in available data, the functionality of the online interface has also been improved, allowing more refined searching and browsing of the Museum’s collections, and—new this month—the ability for online visitors to download the Museum’s collections metadata to sort, study, and use it to suit their own research interests under a CC BY 3.0 Creative Commons license. Launched in December 2012, the interactive Research Map and Timeline highlights many of the Museum's research projects since its founding in 1887. Initially, showcasing 125 projects (commemorating the Museum’s 125th anniversary on December 6, 2012), the interactive website has now grown to include 267 research projects. New Partnership with Digital Antiquity Expands Scholarly Access Finally, in another recent expansion of scholarly access, the Penn Museum has partnered with Digital Antiquity—a collaborative non-profit organization devoted to enhancing preservation of and access to irreplaceable archaeological records and data—to provide free, open access to supplementary material from 19 books previously published by the Museum since 2000. This supplementary material—archaeological data sets, color images, and original field reports from scholarly expeditions—is now available online at tDAR—The Digital Archaeological Record—a unique digital repository for archaeological data. Previously provided on CDs or DVDs in the back of the Museum’s research publications, these supplementary materials are now available for download free of charge by registered tDAR users. Since tDAR’s content is indexed by major search engines, this collaboration exposes the Museum’s published digital content to searchers who may otherwise be unaware of these books and their associated digital media. The books themselves are available for purchase at the University of Pennsylvania Press (Penn Press) website. Supplementary materials are currently available for the following books: Asia & the Pacific •Ban Chiang, a Prehistoric Village Site in Northeast Thailand, Volume 1: The Human Skeletal Remains •Mapping Mongolia: Situating Mongolia in the World from Geologic Time to the Present •Santa Cruz Island Figure Sculpture and Its Social and Ritual Contexts Middle East/Eurasia •Botanical Aspects of Environment and Economy at Gordion, Turkey •Exploring Iran: The Photography of Erich F. Schmidt, 1930-1940 •Gordion Seals and Sealings Individuals and Society •Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers of the Baikal Region, Siberia Bioarchaeological Studies of Past Life Ways •Peoples and Crafts in Period IVB at Hasanlu, Iran Mesoamerica •Tikal Report 11: Map of the Ruins of Tikal, El Petén, Guatemala and Georeferenced Versions of the Maps Therein •The Artifacts of Tikal—Ornamental and Ceremonial Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal, Report 27A •The Artifacts of Tikal—Utilitarian Artifacts and Unworked Material Tikal Report 27B •The Maya Vase Conservation Project •Settlement Archaeology at Quiriguá, Guatemala •Tikal Report 34, Part A: Additions and Alterations: A Commentary on the Architecture of the North Acropolis, Tikal, Guatemala •Tikal Report 37: Historical Archaeology at Tikal, Guatemala Europe •Dún Ailinne: Excavations at an Irish Royal Site, 1968-1975 •Etruscan Myth, Sacred History, and Legend •Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 2: The Settlement History of the Vrokastro Area and Related Studies •Reports on the Vrokastro Area, Eastern Crete, Volume 3 The Vrokastro Regional Survey Project, Sites and Pottery

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/63985/The-Penn-Museum-expands-digital-access-to-its-collections-and-research-projects#.UfNY221vaSo[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

miércoles, 17 de julio de 2013

Después de varios años de esfuerzo, el navegador Mozila Firefox para Maya Hablantes



Después de varios años de esfuerzo, el navegador Mozila Firefox actualiza su funcionamiento para Maya Hablantes y lenguas tradicionales nativas Mesoamericanas

 Es un esfuerzo conjunto en el cual se ha logrado el introducir lenguas no solo Mayas sino Chatino, Mixteco, Náhuatl clásico, Nahuatl de la sierra norte de Puebla, Nguiba, Purépecha, Otomí, Rarámuri, Tenek,   Wixárika, Yáqui, Zapoteco Diiste´, Zapoteco Xhidza, Kichwa. 

Y esperemos con el esfuerzo conjunto se agreguen más lenguas progresivamente para que los hablantes nativos y hablantes nuevos tengan las mismas oportunidades y una voz para el mundo.

Las lenguas Mayas son las siguientes:

Maaya "Yucateco", Ch´ol, Kaqchikel, q´eqchi´, Tojolabal, Tseltal, Tsotsil


Áantajnakech a sut Firefox

Mozilla Firefox ich maaya
Firefox beeta'an tumen Mozilla, jun múuch' yóok'olkabil máako'ob ku múul meyajo'ob ti'al u p'áatal je'ek'abil Web, ti'al tuláakal máak yéetel ti'al ka'a meyjanak ti’ je'el máaxake'.




Mozilla Firefox en ch'ol.

Firefox meelbyl y cháan Mozilla, jump'eel p'éejty leel lum'al jopolonla tyi e'tyel ch'an ja'mäl jiñi Web, tyi pe'tälen mulawil.





Mozilla Firefox en Tojolabal



Mozilla Firefox en Tseltal



Mozilla Firefox en Tsotsil



Mozilla Firefox en Kaqchikel



Mozilla Firefox en Q´ueqchi´






jueves, 11 de julio de 2013

BAKTÚN, Primera Novela en Maya subtitulada al español dará voz a la cultura indígena




Este 15 de Julio saldrá al aire  BAKTÚN, La primera Novela hablada en Maya subtitulada al español buscará el promover la cultura y sus raíces reflejadas en la modernidad en televisión pública de Quintana Roo, México, dirigida por el director Bruno Cárcamo Arvide.

El objetivo del director era crear un espectáculo que sea entretenido lo suficiente para cautivar a una audiencia local y extranjera, mientras se educa acerca de la cultura Maya y la preservación de su lengua indígena.

La serie narra la historia de Jacinto, un joven maya que emigra a Estados Unidos, a quien el director describe como "un chavo (joven) maya que al final termina siendo un maya que se viste de forma tradicional, que habla maya, que tiene sus tradiciones y su cultura pero a la vez usa Twitter, vive en Nueva York y habla inglés".

Como la mayoría de las telenovelas, la serie se centra en torno drama romántico. La diferencia con "Baktun" es la cultura maya es su telón de fondo.

Hay que mostrar "cómo debe ser un maya en este mundo globalizado de internet, redes sociales, Twitter para mantener su cultura y poder ser parte de la aldea global; eso es en esencia el génesis de Baktún", señala el cineasta, quien no pertenece a esa etnia.

Jacinto es interpretado por Hilario Chi Canul, quien adapta el guión en español al maya de la serie.
La historia de Jacinto y la referencia al calendario maya contenida en el palabra Baktún es una forma de recordar que el mundo maya tiene periodos cíclicos, que no necesariamente terminan de manera catastrófica como muchos creyeron que sucedería con Baktún 13 en 2012.

Hilario Chi Canul, fue exentrenador de diálogos para la película Apocalypto de Mel Gibson, ahora es protagonista de la telenovela y, como asesor de producción, responsable de la eliminación de los 300 besos, describió una vez el gran problema que pretende combatir Baktun: “La lengua maya se duerme a partir de las seis de la tarde, cuando se prende la televisión y la gente se pone a ver novelas en castellano”.
 

Baktún 13, una estela maya que anunciaba el fin de una era y el inicio de otra para el 21 de diciembre de 2012, fue interpretada por muchos como un anuncio del fin del mundo, lo que fue aprovechado por la industria del cine y el turismo.

La telenovela tiene 21 capítulos y fue financiada por el gobierno de Quintana Roo, de acuerdo con información del Sistema Quintanarroense de Comunicación Social (SQCS).

TV 7+ transmitió antes dos series cortas habladas completamente en maya: Jaaj T´aan (palabra verdadera) y Ku ya´alik (Él dice). Ambas abordaban temas como la actualidad del mundo maya, música, costumbres y arte.



video

 
Empoderar una lengua por la televisión

Cárcamo, que se declara "apasionado de la cultura maya", dice que fue en la década de 2000 cuando entendió que si realmente "quería aportar algo para empoderar la lengua maya tenía que utilizar el medio de mayor penetración más grande de América Latina, que es la telenovela".

Un primer intento de Cárcamo fue Voces en extinción (2004), un documental que retrata grupos indígenas cuya lengua está en riesgo de perderse y después hizo Palabra verdadera, una revista documental sobre todos los aspectos de la cultura maya.

La telenovela fue presentada en el Museo de Antropología de la Ciudad de México y en varias salas de cine, así como en universidades de Perú y Bolivia.


video



Baktún fue realizada con unos 263,000 dólares y la intención es llegar no solo a la extensa comunidad maya de Yucatán sino también a audiencias de cualquier otro país.

"Toda la concepción del proyecto fue hecha con todo el rigor dramático" que requiere una telenovela para ganar audiencia, sostiene Cárcamo, que junto con su equipo efectuó el ritual de "toma del suput", una semilla para ayudar a afianzar la lengua.

México es uno de los países con mayor diversidad lingüística del mundo. Tiene más de 89 lenguas, habladas por seis millones de habitantes, según el Instituto Nacional de Estadística.

El maya es la segunda lengua indígena más hablada del país, (758,000 personas) pero expertos han alertado que corre el riesgo de desaparecer, junto a su milenaria cultura, en las próximas dos generaciones.

La mayor franja de población de hablantes del maya en la península de Yucatán tiene de 20 a 24 años, pero son justamente los que están debajo de este rango quienes han dejado de usarla, de acuerdo con el Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH).



fuente:CNN, vooxi

Codices Prehispánicos en edición 109 de Artes de México

Códices prehispánicos 

El artículo introductorio por Miguel León-Portilla, advierte que los códices hablan de “Las cosas divinas, humanas y naturales…” que vivieron nuestros antepasados. Para facilitar la comprensión de estos, el número  está dividido conforme a los grupos de culturas y/o regiones que representan los manuscritos:

1 Los códices mayas: Escrito por David Stuart, uno de los mejores epigrafistas del mundo maya que radica ahora en Austin Texas..


2. Los códices del Grupo Borgia:  Este es un grupo de códices muy bellos pero de difícil interpretación por su naturaleza adivinatoria y la incertidumbre de su proceder. El texto fue escrito por la reconocida Dra. Elizabeth Boone de la Universidad de Tulane.


3. Los códices mixtecos de Oaxaca: Relatan genealogías y epopeyas del Señor Ocho Venado, gobernante mixteco. Su autor, el Dr Manuel Hermann, ofrece por primera vez, una interpretación de la  vida de “Ocho Venado”, basada únicamente en  la lectura de los códices.


4.  Los códices del Centro de México que marcan la transición de los prehispánicos a los coloniales. El Dr Xavier Noguez eligió tres códices para hablar de ello desde varios puntos de vista: el Borbónico, la Tira de la Peregrinación y la Matrícula de Tributos . 


5. Por último, tenemos un innovador artículo, escrito por el Dr. Johannes Neurath, que nos invita a entender hoy el uso ritual de los códices a través de sus imágenes.

Los códices prehispánicos son complejas obras pictóricas que relatan en un solo enunciado visual el universo de los dioses, el destino de los hombres, los fenómenos naturales, los descubrimientos astronómicos y la historia de los pueblos. Encuadernados en forma de acordeón, solamente se conservan alrededor de veinte ejemplares y la mayoría se encuentra en el extranjero. En estas páginas nos acercamos a través de ellos, desde una perspectiva estética, a las formas de vida prehispánicas de los mayas, mixtecos y mexicas

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 Pre-hispanic Codices


The introductory article by Miguel Leon-Portilla, warns that the codices speak of "Things divine, human and natural ..." which our ancestors lived. To facilitate understanding of these, the number is divided according to cultural groups and / or regions that represent the manuscripts:



1. Mayan codices: Written by David Stuart, one of the world's best Mayan epigraphers now resides in Austin Texas .

2.The Borgia Group: This is a very beautiful group of codices but difficult to interpret in nature divination and uncertainty for its action. The text was written by the renowned Dr. Elizabeth Boone Tulane University.


3. Oaxaca Mixtec codices: Relate genealogies and epics of Lord Eight Deer, Mixtec ruler. Its author, Dr Manuel Hermann, provides for the first time, an interpretation of the life of "Eight Deer" based solely on reading the codices.


4. The codices Mexico Center that mark the transition from the colonial prehispanic. Dr Xavier Noguez chose three codices to discuss it from several points of view: the Bourbon, the Pilgrimage Strip and Registration of Taxes.


5. Finally, we have a groundbreaking article, written by Dr. Johannes Neurath, who invites us to understand today the ritual use of the codices through their images. 5. Finally, we have a groundbreaking article, written by Dr. Johannes Neurath, who invites us to understand today the ritual use of the codices through their images. 


The painter-scribes of the pre-Hispanic codices, the “tlacuilos”, could dialogue with their heart, producing unique works of art that revealed their perception of daily life, sacred matters, time, nature and their gods. This pictorial art is one of many important and interconnected art forms passed down to us from the cultures that existed before the Spaniards’ arrival